Collaborative Teaching

Goochland County Public Schools

Tag: collaboration

How to Stop Cringing at Group Work, and Why Your Students Deserve It

Group work has always been a passion of mine. When I first became a teacher, I wanted my students to have the opportunity to learn and work together as much as possible; five years later, I still see the value of having heterogeneous groups of students learning to work with one another.

In our collaborative classroom, students have the opportunity to work with all types of ability levels and backgrounds, but our goal is to highlight and the value of working with diverse strengths.

Group Work Frameworks

We know that students can gain knowledge by working through projects and problems with their peers; however, students have to be taught how to effectively work together. There are some excellent frameworks out there, including Scrum and the Kagan Cooperative Learning, that help scaffold learning in groups.

Modeling Group Work

I believe the teacher has to lay the foundation for group work and model what it looks like to work with others. As a co-teacher, I am fortunate to have ample opportunities for modeling, but that does not mean that modeling how to work with others is an unachievable goal for those without co-teachers. You just have to be proactive by reaching out to others and being open to the work that goes into collaboration.

In the past, I have been guilty of assigning group work without modeling how I want my students to collaborate. Now I realize that I have to model how to share the workload; this includes demonstrating how to work through conflict as well as helping students realize the potential of picking teams based on strengths. Never forget the power of your presence as a teacher. The teacher is the most influential person in the classroom. The students will mimic whatever the teacher does, and teachers have to show students how to work effectively together. It may not be a statewide goal, but it is a life skill.

“Never believe that you are better than anybody else, but remember that you are just as good.”    -John Wooden

This quote by John Wooden is a great way to start engaging your students about what it means to be on a team. When we work with others, we really should be serving others instead of competing against one another. I try to teach my students that we all have our strengths and weaknesses, but what is most important is how we use our strengths to help others.

How to Pick Groups for Group Work

One way to help your students understand the importance of recognizing strengths is by teaching them students to pick their own groups. When you do so, encourage them to choose teammates based upon skills the group needs to succeed, instead of picking based upon friendship. Go through the group project expectations as a class and then discuss what types of skills would be needed in order to create the best project. Here’s an example of some of the questions we encourage our students to ask when picking groups:

  • Do I need a teammate who is skilled at drawing?
  • Do I need a teammate who knows how to code?
  • If I’m not particularly organized, could I find a teammate who would help me keep everything together
  • How can I surround myself with the best people for the job? 

Help your students realize that what makes us different can also make us stronger.

Benefits of Collaborative Teaching

Amanda Steeley, Special Education Teacher @AmandaSteeley

The movement toward fully inclusive education is gaining momentum. Part of the reason for this goes beyond parental and administrative requests: teachers and students are enjoying its benefits. If you know me, you know that I am loving my first year in the collaborative classroom. But my fulfillment is supported by research, too.

Zou, Kim and Kerekes (2011) explored the benefits of collaborative teaching at the college level specifically for pre-service teachers. Imagine, exposing pre-service teachers to collaborative practices as students before they become collaborative teachers themselves. This makes so much sense, and yet, it was neither my experience nor that of anyone else I know.

The article itself, Collaborative Teaching in an Integrated Methods Course, concluded that currently there is just not enough research to support greater benefits with this model of preparing pre-service teachers, but just like the growth of collaborative teaching in K-12 education, I’m sure further research may increase this practice, as well.

What I did takeaway from this article were the several benefits of collaborative teaching cited by its authors for both students and instructors.

Benefits of Collaborative Teaching

Benefits to Students

  • Interest and enthusiasm
  • Improved achievement
  • Enhanced ability to work in teams
  • Increased interdisciplinary learning

Benefits to Teachers:

  • Increased growth from professional discussions
  • Increased learning from one another’s experiences
  • Increased learning from one another’s teaching styles
  • Increased opportunity for curriculum integration/real world experiences

The authors also cited Hinton & Downing (1998) when explaining “collaborative teaching is most beneficial when it promotes diversity by including teaching members from different disciplinary areas in addition to different ethnic and cultural backgrounds”. I could not agree with this more. Any time we can use our collaborative teaching practice to model treating each other with humanity, everyone wins. In my own practice, I believe that the simple juxtaposition of Mr. Beasley and I (male and female) in addition to being SPED and general education counter-parts, is valuable: We just bring different things to the table.

In future posts we can address challenges, but today’s focus highlighted benefits. Do you teach collaboratively? What do you consider the greatest benefits to your students and team?

 

References

Hinton, S. & Downing, J.E. (1998). Team teaching a college core foundation course; Instructors’ and students’ assessments. Richmond, KY: Eastern Kentucky  University. ERIC Document No. ED 429469.

Kerekes, J., Jinyoung, K., & Zhou, G. (2011). Collaborative teaching of an integrated   methods course.     International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education. 3(2). 123-138.

Teaching Styles: Starting a Co-Teaching Relationship

Amanda Steeley, Special Education Teacher

It’s 4:30 AM and I’m up to grade papers and prepare for the science lab I will teach today. I listen to the coffee drip with eager anticipation and hope that my own two children will at least give me 30 minutes of uninterrupted work time before they wake up requesting breakfast. The busy demands of my collaborative teaching position in 5th grade at GES have me stressed in such a way that I am both growing and fulfilled; it is a good stress.

My 4-year-old heard me and just woke up… Thank goodness for Caillou. Let me get to the point… Three things I would like to reflect on since my last entry: teaching styles, pre-test/post-test data, and co-planning:

Teaching Styles:

Joe and I have a lot in common – we both believe in the power of music for teaching, the importance of relationships with students and families, and imperativeness of student engagement. However, we are still two different individuals with unique backgrounds and experiences. Perhaps our starkest contrasts are that Joe is a male who has taught only general education, and I am a female (mother) who has taught only special education. If I’m not careful, my nurturing qualities might neglect to maximize the potential of every learner. But there is great value when our personalities come together, especially because we are both open to communication with one another.

Joe and I respect one another. This allows us to pull one another aside if we think that either ourselves, or the other person, could have handled a situation with a student better. We reflect with an open mind. We are willing to seek first to understand and then to be understood. I believe this may be one of our greatest strengths as a teaching team. 

Pre-Test/Post-Test Data:

We started using pre-test/post-test comparisons for math this week. The growth, for all students, was thrilling. We are so excited to continue with this practice!

Co-Planning:

Yesterday afternoon, Joe and I quickly reflected on what needed to be done before school the next day. (And quite frankly if I don’t stop writing soon, it won’t be done!) But what I loved about this exchange was that I felt like we were volleying a ping-pong ball:

I’ll take grading the math quiz.

         -Great. I’ll make sure the science data gets entered.

         -OK. Reading groups are almost set. I’ll finalize that.

         -Awesome. I need to prepare for the lab.

         Etc…

We both know what’s going on. We’re willing to help each other, and we both want to be able to step in for the other person at any time. We collaboratively “own” this classroom. No responsibility rests solely on one individual’s plate, and if it does, the other person is eager to learn the role and support the teacher who must fulfill the responsibility.

Now back to work! Looking forward to another great day!